Early Signs & Symptoms Of Leptospirosis Weil Infectious Disease In Humans & Natural Prevention Tips

Early Signs & Symptoms Of Leptospirosis Weil Infectious Disease In Humans & Natural Prevention Tips


Leptospirosis Infectious Disease Symptoms,
Treatment And Prevention. Leptospirosis is an infectious disease of
humans and animals that is caused by pathogenic spirochetes of the genus Leptospira. Leptospirosis is distributed worldwide, but
not found in the polar regions of the globe. It is most common in the tropics. The organism infects a wide range of animals,
including mammals, birds, amphibians, and reptiles and is transmitted to humans through
exposure of mucous membranes or cuts in the skins to the body fluid of an acutely infected
animal or by exposure to soil or fresh water which is contaminated with the urine of an
animal that is a chronic carrier. It is also known that occupational exposure
probably accounts for 30 to 50 per cent of human cases of leptospirosis. The main occupational groups at risk include
farm workers, veterinarians, pet shop owners, field agricultural workers, abattoir workers,
plumbers, meat handlers and slaughter house workers, coal miners, workers in the fishing
industry, military troops, milkers, and sewer workers. Although leptospirosis continues to be predominantly
an occupational disease, in recent decades, it has also increasingly been recognized as
a disease of recreation. The disease may be acquired during �adventure�
travel or sporting events that involve fresh water or hiking (e.g �mud runs�). The exotic-pet trade further increases the
likelihood of transmission. Widespread flooding may lead to epidemic spread
of leptospirosis in large populations. Flooding on a smaller scale may also lead
to individuals contracting the disease. Urban dwellers in economically deprived areas
may contract the disease through exposure to rat urine. In the case of the two brothers who recently
died from the infection in West Africa, they drank straight from the can of coke, on which
rats were thought to have urinated on and the urine deposited on the can had dried while
the cans were in storage before being sold to, unwittingly, to the unfortunate brothers. Symptoms Of Leptospirosis Infection. In most cases, about 90 per cent, when a person
has been infected with leptospirosis, the organism incubates for a period of time. After gaining entry into the body, organisms
quickly spread through the bloodstream to all organs, but particularly the liver and
kidney. The incubation period is usually 5 to 14 days
but has been described from 72 hours to a month or more depending on the immunologis
status of the person. Then the infected person develops a fever
and may also show other symptoms ranging from headache, nausea and vomiting, which may often
be confused with viral illness. In 10 per cent of cases, the presentation
is more dramatic, and the infection has an overall case fatality rate of 5 to 10 per
cent. Known as Weil disease or icteric leptospirosis,
leads to jaundice, renal failure, and hemorrhage. Other organ systems such as the lungs, heart,
blood vessels, central nervous system are also frequently affected as the disease progresses
and begins to destroy these vital organs. In the kidneys, the leptospires (units of
the organism) migrate to the renal tubules and tubular lumen, and cause inflammation
of the nephrons (nephritis) and tubular necrosis (death of the cells of the tissue that makes
up the tubules). As the capillary vasculitis progresses, normal
renal function is affected by substantial decrease in the glomerular filtration rate
could lead to rapid renal failure that would require dialysis. Renal failure is usually due to tubular damage,
but hypovolemia from dehydration and from altered capillary permeability can also contribute
to renal failure. In the same manner, centrilobular necrosis
in the liver further worsens the health status of the infected person as jaundice may occur
as a result of hepatocellular dysfunction. Bleeding in the lungs resulting from burst
capillaries (medically described as pulmonary alveolar hemorrhage) is the major ultimate
cause of death. Management of the illness. Treatment of leptospirosis should be started
as soon as possible. Treatment is begun empirically in patients
with a plausible exposure history and compatible symptoms, as culture times for Leptospira
are long and recovery rates are low. The criterion standard for serologic identification
of leptospires, microscopic agglutination testing (MAT), is available only at reference
laboratories. Paired acute and convalescent serum specimens
can provide delayed confirmation of the diagnosis. As in all cases of ill-health it is strongly
advised that people head to the hospital to see a doctor in any situation where a fever
has not responded to paracetamol for more than 24 hours. Do not engage in self-medication. It is dangerous as a mis-diagnosed illness
could be life threatening. Some cases of leptospirosis infection could
be uncomplicated and not require hospitalization, but it is only a doctor that can determine
this after proper diagnosis (which may involve laboratory investigation). In such a case, the doctor would prescribe
the right medication to be taken by the person. In hospitalized patients, the doctor would
also prescribe and administer the right drugs, as would be expected. Patients with severe leptospirosis (Weil disease)
require supportive therapy and careful management of renal, hepatic, hematologic, and central
nervous system complications. Prevention of infection. When you have to attend events where you may
be served canned drinks, please take with a generous amount of clean white tissue paper. When the drink is served, soak the tissue
paper in water and use it to clean the top of the can thoroughly and the sides of the
can close to the point where it is opened and drank from. Please do this two or three times, each using
fresh tissue soaked in water, before opening the can. Even if you have cleaned the can, you could
also make assurance doubly sure by using a straw to sip the drink or pour it into clean
glass tumbler. Taking these steps would prevent direct oral
contact with the can and prevent infection. If you love this video, please like and share
your opinion in the comment box. Don’t forget to click the subscribe button
below for More Research Based Home Remedies And Natural Health Tips. Follow Us On Facebook @naturalherbcures and
Twitter @ naturalherbcure and our official website at NaturalHealingGuides.com.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *