Heart disease & high blood pressure

Heart disease & high blood pressure


Heart Disease & High Blood Pressure From the day we are born, to the day we die
our heart never stops its ceaseless pumping of oxygenated blood throughout the body. Amazingly it contracts between 70 – 80 times
per minute, day and night, for a typical lifespan of 70 years. For many individuals it beats even longer. The muscular walls do get an occasional respite
during the diastolic phase, but it is only a temporary respite. Because the heart is never given time to recover
from its arduous exercising, it requires a constant supply of oxygen. If you’re in poor physical condition and
decide to run for a bus, for example, your heart and lungs would be unable to meet the
sudden demand for extra oxygen rich blood. As a result, your leg muscles can’t receive
the oxygen they need, and you’ll likely experience pain or leg cramps. However, on the positive side, you can rest
the muscles in your legs and give them the opportunity to recover from their exertion. Unfortunately, your heart doesn’t have this
luxury. If the muscles of your heart were to rest,
your entire body would stop functioning and you’d die in a very short time. Here’s how your heart works … the coronary
arteries which transport the blood to the walls of the heart emerge from the aorta which
exits from the left side of the heart. The heart tissue becomes infused with the
blood, and pumps the remaining blood out to other areas of the body. Problems arise when plaque seriously limits
the cardiac output. One of the more serious consequences of hypertension
(or high blood pressure) is cardiac damage. This results when the pressure of the blood
going through the heart is abnormally high, and eventually the heart can’t cope with
the prolonged and systematic pressure. It will eventually begin to fail, often with
devastating results. Once the heart is damaged as a result of high
blood pressure, other problems can develop. These may include heart disease such as angina,
or even a heart attack with all the accompanying symptoms and problems. Can Anxiety Affect Your Blood Pressure? As we briefly mentioned above, assessing your
blood pressure readings can be trickier than it might at first appear. It’s the numerous variables that come into
play that make it so tricky. In order for your doctor to gain a complete
picture of your specific situation, he needs to be aware of the impact these variables
may be having on your system. Here’s a short list of factors that can affect
your blood pressure reading: ⦁ Your Emotional State
⦁ Exercise ⦁ Respiration
⦁ A Recent Heavy Meal ⦁ Smoking
⦁ Your Alcohol Intake ⦁ The Room Temperature
⦁ Pain ⦁ Bladder Problems
⦁ Circadian Rhythms ⦁ Your Age
⦁ Your Gender ⦁ Your Race As surprising as it might sound, anxiety can
raise your blood pressure by as much as 30mm Hg. Even anxiousness about visiting the doctor
or about how well you’ll do when he takes your blood pressure can cause an instinctual
fight or flight response that raises your blood pressure. The more anxious you are, the greater the
impact on your readings. So always keep in mind that you should be
relaxed and comfortable when your blood pressure is taken. If you have the opportunity to sit in a quiet
room, at a comfortable room temperature, and maybe thumb through a favorite magazine beforehand,
take advantage of this opportunity to settle down and put aside your fears. You want your doctor to have the best information
possible before prescribing any medication, and the best way to make sure your blood pressure
readings are accurate is to put aside your anxieties. The more comfortable you are with your surroundings
and with the person taking your blood pressure, the more accurate your readings. In fact, it’s been found that your blood pressure
measurements are generally higher when taken by your doctor, and to a lesser degree, even
your nurse. This is known as the “white coat syndrome”
and it’s something to be aware of next time you go to see the doctor. You should also be aware of your respiration
and pulse rate since both can affect your blood pressure reading. If you had to climb a set of stairs to get
to your doctor’s office and your heart is racing, make sure you have at least fifteen
minutes to relax and settle back into a comfortable resting pulse rate before your blood pressure
is checked. Finally, learn as much about your blood pressure
as you can ahead of time. This will generally put your fears to rest. And if you have any questions or concerns,
ask your doctor. He should be able to give you a thorough explanation
of how your blood pressure works and how it might or might not affect any existing medical
conditions you may have. Blood Pressure Ranges Blood pressure ranges are not necessarily
the same for everyone. There are varying factors that need to be
taken into account. For instance, age, race, health and gender
all influence a healthy blood pressure reading. However, blood pressure ranges do provide
an important perspective in the diagnosis of many diseases. So, in general terms, a healthy person should
have a systolic pressure no higher than 120 mm of Hg and a diastolic pressure approximately
80 mm of Hg. 120/80 is considered to be a text book classic
blood pressure of an average person. An experienced medical practitioner will often
interpret a patient’s blood pressure range with the understanding that some patients
become excited or agitated simply by having their blood pressure taken. Therefore, a slightly elevated range may not
necessarily be a concern in all situations. This is why your physician not only takes
your blood pressure every time you visit the office, but also encourages you to come in
for periodic readings even when you’re feeling fine. The more data he can assemble over time, the
more he can determine if there is reason for concern or not. A systolic blood pressure ranging from 140
mm to 159 mm, along with a diastolic blood pressure ranging from 90 mm to 99 mm is known
as stage one high blood pressure. Similarly, a systolic blood pressure of 160
or higher, along with a diastolic blood pressure of 100 higher, is known as stage two high
blood pressure. The higher end of a blood pressure range in
a healthy person is normally expected to remain below a systolic pressure of 125 mm. Systolic pressure measures the compression
capacity of cardiac tissues in a person’s body coupled with the free flow of blood in
their arterioles and arteries. Similarly, the lower end of a healthy blood
pressure range is expected to remain at or below 80 mm. A persistent low diastolic blood pressure
range between 85 and 90 may warrant your physician to prescribe an anti-hypertensive drug. This is even more important if the condition
is linked to symptoms pertaining to cardio-vascular disorders such as feelings of intense pain
in the body, increased sweating or with symptoms related to the end organ damage in body This
video for information purposes only. Thank you for watching!

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