Tutorial Inspector URcap (1/3): Basic set up | SICK AG

Tutorial Inspector URcap (1/3): Basic set up | SICK AG


Hi! Welcome to the first part of the Inspector
URC+ tutorial series. My name is Nils and I work as an application
engineer at SICK and I am the developer of this URcap plugin. In this first part we will show you how to
configure the Inspector URCap plugin to create a simple vision guided pick and place application
for the universal robots, together with our SICK Inspector PIM60 vision sensor. To perform the basic set up, we need to follow a few simple steps First of all, we need to install the Inspector URCap plugin in the robot
• Then the Inspector has to be configured so that the robot can communicate with it. • The next step is to calibrate and align
the Inspector to the robot’s coordinate system. •The next stept is to configure a reference object in the Inspector with the object we want to locate • finally, we are ready to create a simple
program so that the robot can pick an object using coordinates sent from the Inspector. To begin, install the UR+ plugin in the robot. This can be done by transferring the Inspector
URcap to a USB-stick and inserting it into the robot pendant. Go to “Setup Robot” and then press the
“URCaps“ button. Click on the “+” button, then on the USB
Disk and press the SICK Inspector URCap file before pressing ok. Click “open”. and then the robot needs
to be restarted to finalize the process. While rebooting the robot, we will do the
basic configuration settings in the Inspector. For this, we need Sopas ET software, which
can be downloaded from SICK.com. You will find a link in the description below. First, open Sopas and connect it to the Inspector. When the Inspector is connected, start configuring
it, put it in edit mode, click on Inspector PIM60 menu and choose the interfaces and I/O
settings. In here, there are a few basic settings you
need to define: • Enable Ethernet and make sure Ethernet
raw is set. • Check that “Web Server” is enabled and in the webserver tab make sure it runs on port 80 and that we have allowed changes “via webserver enabled” In the Ethernet Raw tab, change the communication
protocol to TCP and make sure that changes via Ethernet raw are allowed and STX/ETX is
selected. The start port has to be set to 2114. Click on the “Apply” button and “ok”
button and then set the Inspector in run mode. After that we need to save our settings to
flash. By now, the robot should have rebooted and
we open the SICK Inspector URCap plugin. To do this, go to “program robot installation”
and you should see the SICK Inspector installation node. The first thing we need to do is to enter
the Inspector ’s IP-address and to make sure that the robot connects to
it When the robot is connected to the Inspector,
we can calibrate it and align it to the robot’s base coordinate system. However, before we can do so, we have to set
up the robot’s Tool Center Point, also called TCP. The TCP is the center point in the tool. It is very important that this is set up correctly
for the URCap to work. By default, the TCP position is at the tool
flange position with the z-axis pointing out from the tool flange. For the alignment it is good to have a sharp
pointing object in the tool and define your TCP position on top of the tool. The TCP position I have already set up beforehand
using the position wizard. I know my tool is rotated around the y-axis
by 0.524 radians which I get from the “onrobot RG2 gripper plugin”. When we are sure that our TCP is correct,
we can go on and start calibration and alignment of the Inspector. To do this, we need to place a regular SICK
checkerboard calibration target in front of the Inspector. This can be downloaded in PDF format from
sick.com. There is a link in the description box below. To start with the calibration, we go to the
SICK Inspector Installation node and click the “calibration” button. First we need to make sure that the robot
is outside the field of view. After that click the “start calibration”
button and enter the size of the target square. In this case, we have a 15 mm square target. Now we can press the “done” button. The Inspector will then calibrate itself. This takes around 1-2minutes. When this is done, we can start aligning the
Inspector to the robot’s coordinate system. We do this by pointing the TCP of the robot
at these 4 crosses: A, B, C and D. Be as precise as you possibly can when pointing the TCP
at the crosses. We start with cross A and click the “done”
button, move to the B cross, press the “done” The same goes for the C and D cross. When we are done with that, we can click on
“send coordinates to sensor” and the Inspector will be able to output the coordinates in
the robots coordinate system. After finishing the calibration and alignment,
we can now switch to the TCP position to be inside of our gripper tool- To do that we
need to go to the TCP configuration and choose the original TCP and set it as “default”. Finally, save the settings. Now we can go on with defining our reference
object in the Inspector with the part we want to locate. To do this, we need to switch back to Sopas. Now put the Inspector in edit mode, remove
the calibration target and place the object in front of the Inspector . Press the “Teach
reference object” button. We will here use the “object locator”
tool to locate the object in the image. Select the tool and drag it around the object. Adjust the selection to be as close as possible
around the object. In this case we will make a mask since the
object is sticking up a bit of the side. On the right side we can see that the Inspector
calculates the settings for us. We can switch to the live image to see that
our object is located in the whole field of view. In here, we can also change pick position
which is the coordinate which is actually send to the camera. This is also possible to offset in the URcap. Therefore we won´t change that now. At this point, we have to configure the Ethernet
output string. just To do this we go to the inspector PIM 60 menu and choose “Ethernet result output”. To the left, we need
to set the angle type to radians, the coordinates to mm and that the Inspector should send aligned coordinates. To build the our output string we choose the object locator tool tag. Inside this tag, we first place the decision
flag, the x, y, z coordinates and the rotation. We also need a comma and space in between each data field. We copy this and place it between the others. Finally, we need to parenthesis around the
whole expression. We can now verify our output string and see
if its correct. So this is the format that URCap needs to receive the data. We need to have a decision flag to begin with and than the (d, x, y, z, r) When this is done we can click the “apply” button and “ok” button. We can put the inspector in run mode and save the settings to flash. The final thing we need to do is to create
a simple robot program. To do this, we go to the program tap and click on “empty program”. Start by making a move node and setting our
start waypoint. To do that click “set this waypoint”. Then we go to the structure tab, after that
to the URcaps tab. To add a SICK Inspector URcap node. First of all we need to teach the robot how to grip
the object we have located. To do this move the robot away from the field
of view and press the “get post button” This will give us the coordinates of the object the inspector has located. We can than place the gripper over the object in the way we want to grip it. pressing the button “set pose”. The URCap now calculates the offset values
from the position given by the Inspector to the TCP position of the gripper. We can leave the move settings, speed settings
and advanced settings as they are. We can now start the robot and make sure it
moves to the right position. All we need now are some nodes to open and
close the gripper and we have a simple pick and place program. First we need to open the gripper. We set the gripper width to 40 mm. Then we move to the object and add another
programming node to close the gripper around the object. We set that to 15 mm. After that, we want to lift the object up
so we add another waypoint and make that a “relative position”. We can set the waypoint where we are now and
move the robot up to 50 mm. We want to drop off the object somewhere,
therefore we add another waypoint. We can drop off our objects here. Click “set this waypoint”. Finally, we need to open our gripper, so we
set it to 40 mm again. Now we can test this program and see that
it’s working. There we have a simple vision guided pick
and place application using coordinates to send from the SICK Inspector PIM60 to the
universal robot. Thanks for watching this video. Make sure to subscribe to the SICK YouTube
channel so you don’t miss the other tutorials in this Inspector URCap series.

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